Lunch with the Retired Women Teachers of Ontario

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The scenic town of Perth glowed in the warmth of the bright spring sun as we made our way along historic Gore Street last Thursday.  The Retired Women Teachers of Ontario had kindly invited me to speak at their monthly meeting, and they chose the popular Maximilian Restaurant as their venue.

Maximilian, open since 1975 has enjoyed tremendous popularity in Perth, as well as the surrounding area, and many come from neighbouring towns and cities to sample their delicious cuisine; particularly their famous melt-in-your-mouth schnitzel dishes!

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I received a warm welcome from the RWTO, and once everyone had arrived and settled into their seats, I read two short stories to the group –each with a theme about education. The first story from my book “Lanark County Kid”, is about the transition from the one room school houses to a centralized school, built in 1968 – Glen Tay Public School.  The story describes the debates that went on and on for months, regarding the financial strain on the townships and  should they proceed with building a new school. The discussions that followed highlighted the pros and cons by both parents and teachers concerning which of the two styles of education provided the best overall experience for the students.  The story describes the new school, larger student population, and the advantages and benefits of the new facilities and modern methods of teaching.

The second story that I presented focused on a popular local teacher in the 1960s and 1970s – Mrs. Dencie (Tryon) Conboy.  One of the unique features of Mrs. Conboy’s classes was her fondness for blending studies with physical activities, usually in the form of softball games, designed to help burn off pent-up energy when students became restless in her classroom.  Her teaching style was ahead of its time, and many of her students went on to become successful, contributing members of their communities.  The story was a tribute to her methods of ‘thinking outside the box’ in her popular and perhaps slightly unorthodox and much-loved teaching style.

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After lunch there was an opportunity to meet with many of the teachers, and to discuss the changes in education through the years, and some interesting new developments on the horizon.

The lunch at Maximilian was delicious as always, and it was a delight to meet with so many of the members of the RWTO.   There were lots of fascinating discussions as well as questions about the five books on Lanark County that I brought to the presentation.  I would imagine that teachers and books go together like honey and bees, so it was my pleasure to introduce the members to my collection of published books.

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The sun was still bright and warm as we departed from our delicious lunch with the RWTO members.  There are few things as peaceful and lovely as a drive through the town of Perth on a mild spring day.

Many thanks to the RWTO members for their warm hospitality, and for making our visit with them such a delight!

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For more information about ‘Lanark County Kid: My Travels Up and Down the Third Line”

For more information about Maximilian Restaurant in Perth Ontario:

Maximilian Restaurant Perth Ontario

For information about the Retired Women Teachers of Ontario:

RTWO history

 

Great Aunt Clara’s Late June Roses

June roses

Although it didn’t look like much until late in June each year, around the third or fourth week of the month, the old rosebush, planted by Dad’s Aunt Clara Richards Carberry, sprang reliably back to life.  Great Aunt Clara had planted the rosebush back in the 1940s, along our fence, on the east side of the house, under the poplar trees.

It was an uncertain time when she planted that rosebush, the years between 1939 and 1945, when World War II raged on, separating families from loved ones, and prematurely ending young lives, as they fought bravely, on the front lines in Europe.

By the time that I was old enough to be aware of the rosebush, it had spread, as perennials will, and imparted a bright pink show of fragrant roses that stretched  for several yards, along the old fence.  For the entire five decades that we lived in the house, that rosebush bloomed faithfully. Without any pruning or watering, it gave us a lovely fuchsia display, each year, shortly after the summer solstice had passed, as though that was its signal to begin to bloom.

Maybe in such an unsettled time in our history, Clara wanted to create some beauty that would last; something predictable and steadfast; something she could count on.

So the rosebush bloomed like clockwork, late in June, each year for decades, watching silently from its sheltered patch under the poplars, along the fence, as one by one we finished our years in school, and left the old homestead, to go out and make our way in the world.  It watched all five of us come and go, and it thrived long past that time, for another quarter of a century, until our father passed away, and our Mother sold the house, and moved to town.

With a legacy like that, how could any of the short-lived ‘annual’ plants ever compare to this faithful old perennial, planted by Clara, so many years ago?  More importantly, how could we ever forget those bright, pink, fragrant roses, and how they graced the edge of our yard, so beautifully each year, late in June?

 

 

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