You May be Irish if…

Irish pub

The Top Ten Ways to tell if you’re Irish:

1. You have the ‘gift of gab’. There is an ancient rock near Cork, Ireland at Blarney Castle and they say that anyone who kisses the stone will have the gift of gab. If you are truly of Irish descent, then there’s likely no pressing need to make the journey, as you surely already possess the talent of talking rings around most other people.

2. You are musical. Maybe you play an instrument or perhaps you just sing in the shower, but the gift of music is in your Irish blood and you will not be able to resist tapping your toe or strumming your fingers on the table when someone gets their fiddle out and plays a tune.

3. You have strong convictions. Whether the topic is religion, politics or your favourite sports team there will be no point in challenging your beliefs which you hold dearly, and you will argue about these beliefs passionately and convincingly.

4. You have a gift for writing and story-telling. You will be the one at the pub or social gathering that will keep the crowd entertained with your vivid and colourful tales. There may even be a bit of exaggeration thrown in for good measure, but it just makes your story all the more interesting.

5. You’ve got lovely skin and pleasing features. You may have porcelain, pale skin, or you may have freckles that outnumber the days of the year, but your features will be pleasantly proportioned and your eyes bright, with a genuine smile that lights up your face.

6. Your dinner is not complete without some spuds at the table. Whether it’s home-fries for breakfast, French fries for lunch, or baked, mashed or boiled for supper, the humble potato is a regular, healthy staple in your diet and you wouldn’t think of going a day without it.

7. You will likely have a few Irish names in your family tree because people of Irish descent are proud of their heritage and often pass down the names of their ancestors: Sean, Shane, Annie, Maggie, Michael, Patrick, Francis, Kelly, Bridget, Daniel, Aiden, Liam, Eileen, Irene, Brian, Barry, Collin, Ryan, Katie, Thomas, Matthew, Molly, William, Robert, Mark, Elizabeth, Peter, Sinead, Eva, Fay, Julia and so on…

8. You are better at swearing than most people. Partly because of your natural gift of gab and partly because of your quick wit, the swear-words seem to roll freely off of your tongue. You have even been known to make up your own, or stick a word in the middle for good measure, like “abso-bleedin’-lutely”.

9. Nothing brings out your poetic nature, natural ability to talk non-stop, or your talent for swearing like a few pints at the pub. A drink or two or three tends to make your exaggerations a bit more colourful, your storytelling even more fascinating, and your talent for music and dancing shines even brighter.

10. You are loyal. Your strong convictions and unshakeable beliefs are the most visible when it comes to your family and friends. If someone insults your friend then they’ve likely got a fight on their hands that they won’t win. If someone says something unkind about your family then they will have a nasty surprise coming to them that they didn’t bargain for. You are fiercely loyal to all you hold dear.

So, what are the Irish really like? Perhaps the best description comes from the popular historian, Carl Wittke:

“The so-called Irish temperament is a mixture of flaming ego, hot temper, stubbornness, great personal charm and warmth, and a wit that shines through adversity. An irrepressible buoyancy, a vivacious spirit, a kindliness and tolerance for the common frailties of man and a feeling that ‘it is time enough to bid the devil good morning when you meet him’ are character traits which North Americans have associated with their Irish neighbors for more than a century.”

Whether you are of Irish descent or merely admire this nation known for its great writers, poets and story-tellers, I will leave you with a traditional Irish blessing and hope that you have the ‘luck o’ the Irish’ wherever life takes you! Sláinte (cheers!)

An Old Irish Blessing

May the road rise up to meet you.
May the wind always be at your back.
May the sun shine warm upon your face,
and rains fall soft upon your fields.
And until we meet again,
May God hold you in the palm of His hand.

http://www.staffordwilson.com

Free Online Searchable Family History Forums

Canterbury Meat Co

A genealogy ‘forum’ is a website where you can research in a safe, friendly and helpful environment. On most of these sites registration is free, and there are members who are dedicated to assisting all genealogists, whether they are beginners or experienced researchers.

On genealogy forums members may ask for advice or offer helpful tips to other researchers. To post your query on forums you have to be a registered member, although the questions and answers posted by others can be read by non members.

You will have access to the surnames database and most searches are possible using any combination of First Name, Surname, Place of Birth or Year of Birth. Some forums are even specific to regions and surnames.

Many family history forums have very active online communities where members can share research tips, show off family photographs or discuss new methods for working on their family trees.

In my own research, I have found that genealogy forums are a great resource when I’ve hit the ‘brick wall’. While working on my maternal grandmother’s tree I was trying to determine the location of a butcher shop that my great-grandfather had owned and operated in the city of Huddersfield, England. Through a genealogy forum with researchers in the U.K., I connected with ‘Pete’ who lived in Huddersfield and he kindly volunteered to stop by the local library and have a look in the city directories from the turn of the century. True to his word, Pete was able to find the listing for the Canterbury Meat Company at 34 Market Street, William Woolsey, proprietor. This is just one example of how forums can connect us with our past and help us to overcome obstacles in expanding our family trees.

I invite you to share the genealogy forums that you have found helpful in your family history research.

As always, good luck with your search!

RootsChat
http://www.rootschat.com/forum/index.php/board,287.0.html

Genealogy Specialists
http://www.genealogy-specialists.com/

Rootsweb
http://boards.rootsweb.com/surname.aspx

Genforum
http://genforum.genealogy.com/my/

My Heritage
http://www.myheritage.com/page/genealogy-message-boards

Surnames from Around the World
http://www.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~jfuller/gen_mail_surnames-gen.html?cj=1&netid=cj&o_xid=0001029688&o_lid=0001029688&o_sch=Affiliate+External#SURNAME-QUERY

Family Workings
http://www.familyworkings.com/Chat/start.html

Family Tree Circles
http://www.familytreecircles.com/

Looking for Kin
http://www.looking4kin.com/groups

Ancestor Explorer
http://ancestorexplorer.proboards.com/

http://www.staffordwilson.com

Free Online Searchable World Census Records – Find Your Ancestor

Mary Rutherford 1940 census 2

Mary Rutherford census 1940

Census records give a snapshot of who your ancestors were and how your ancestor lived. Census records are a government sponsored enumeration or counting of the population of a given area. These records will contain names of the heads of household or often all household members, their ages, citizenship status, and ethnic background. Some census records will state the religion of the individual and may also list their country of origin. In some countries a census will also contain agricultural records, so if your ancestor was a farmer it may list the type and number of farm animals as well as the type and number of bushels of crops produced on their farm during the year.

There are a vast number of online records available from around the world. Many are free, some offer free searches with the option to pay a small fee to view and download the original record. If you are confident that the person in the record is your ancestor, it may be worth the small fee to see the entire record. It will certainly cost less than a trip back to your ancestor’s homeland! Regardless of whether you choose the free census websites, or choose the pay-per-download, you can still gather a wealth of information from around the world with the records available today online.

Shown, in the images above this article are partial census listings from the 1940 U.S. census. In the first image is Mary Rutherford, my great-grandmother, born in 1853, age 87 in 1940 living in Ogdensburg, St. Lawrence County, New York. Mary’s listing was at the bottom of the page. At the top of the next page, the next image above shows her youngest daughter, Nellie Rutherford, age 42, born 1898, and on the line below Avis Exelby, age 21, their servant.

I invite you to click on the ‘Comment’ field at the end of the article and share your successes and online census records not listed that you have found helpful.

As always, good luck with your search!
Arlene Stafford-Wilson
http://www.staffordwilson.com

Canada

http://automatedgenealogy.com/census/

This 1901 Census of Canada features over 5,000,000 lines transcribed by volunteers.
This contains an index to every name in the 1901 Census of Canada including personal data , links to images of the original census pages, and other links including census records from other years, birth, marriage, death, and other related records.

1911 Census of Canada
Includes over 7,000,000 lines transcribed of every member of the household with links to images of original records.
http://automatedgenealogy.com/census11/

United States

U.S. searchable census records – 1790-1940
http://www.censusrecords.com/content/1910_Census

U.S. census tips and records:
http://www.archives.gov/research/census/1850-1930.html

Online, searchable – 1940 Census U.S
http://1940census.archives.gov/

African Americans census tips and records:
http://www.archives.gov/research/african-americans/

Native Americans census tips and records:
http://www.archives.gov/research/census/native-americans/1885-1940.html

Scotland

http://www.scotlandspeople.gov.uk/

Ireland

http://www.nationalarchives.ie/search-the-archives/

Another excellent Irish database website, however there are fees to view records: https://rootsireland.ie/

England and Wales 1841 – 1911

http://www.nationalarchives.gov.uk/records/census-records.htm
and
http://www.ukcensusonline.com/

Holland/Netherlands

http://www.dutchgenealogy.nl/population-registers/

Italy

http://www.italygen.com/italiangenealogicalrecords/censuses.php

Germany

http://www.germanroots.com/germandata.html

Poland

http://search.ancestry.com/oldsearch/locality/dbpage.aspx?tp=1652381&p=5183

Australia

http://www.records.nsw.gov.au/

South Africa

http://www.southafricanfamilyhistory.com/birth-marriage-and-death-records/

Caribbean

https://familysearch.org/search/collection/1804229

New Zealand

http://www.nzhistory.net.nz/search/site/census

Bulgaria

http://familysearch.org/learn/wiki/en/Bulgaria_Census

Austria

http://www.feefhs.org/links/austria.html

Russia

http://www.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~ruswgw/links.html

Croatia

http://www.feefhs.org/links/croatia.html

Denmark

http://www.sa.dk/content/us/genealogy/basic_records/census_lists

Sweden

http://www.genline.com/

Norway
http://www.rhd.uit.no/folketellinger/folketellinger_avansert_e.aspx

South America

http://www.genealogyintime.com/GenealogyResources/Country/South%20America/most_recent_genealogy_records_South_America.html

Africa

http://ecastats.uneca.org/aicmd/

Spain

http://www.ine.es/welcoing.htm

Greece

http://www.statistics.gr/portal/page/portal/ESYE

For more Genealogy tips and tricks:

https://arlenestaffordwilson.wordpress.com/category/genealogy-tips-help-links/
http://www.staffordwilson.com

Genealogy Tip: Christmas Traditions of Our Ancestors

St Nicholas

Ever wonder why we bring a tree into our homes or why we adorn it with lights and tinsel? Why do we hang a stocking? How did egg nog become a beverage associated with the festive season? When did a white haired man in a red suit begin to deliver gifts to children? Why do we eat turkey and stuffing? Why do we buy gifts for each other?

There are countless traditions and customs practised throughout the world at this time of year. Most of these rituals have been passed down to us from our parents, grandparents and great-grandparents. We do these things each year without thinking. Our ancestors brought their traditions with them to the new world and their annual rites of the Christmas season became entrenched in North American culture.

What about our ancestors who did not leave their homelands, but remained in their countries of origin? How are their traditions different than the ones who came to the new world? Below, are some links to Christmas traditions throughout the world. Click on the links to discover where these customs originated and how they are still practised today in your ancestral homelands and in your own home today:

I invite you to comment on the origins of your family’s Christmas traditions and share your ancestral customs with our readers. (To share your traditions – click on ‘comment’ at the end of this article) Merry Christmas!

http://familytreemagazine.com/article/Holy-Nights

http://www.santas.net/aroundtheworld.htm

http://genealogy.about.com/cs/holidays/a/christmas.htm

http://genealogyrevelations.com/2013/12/06/christmas-traditions-around-world-part-heritage/

Ireland: http://www.irishcentral.com/roots/Irelands-ancient-Celtic-Christmas-traditions-revealed-134951493.html

Scotland: http://www.rampantscotland.com/know/blknow11.htm

England: http://www.thegenealogist.co.uk/featuredarticles/dec12_xmas.php

Italy: http://italianfamilygenealogy.com/?p=124

Holland: http://www.whychristmas.com/cultures/holland.shtml

Germany: http://www.germany.travel/en/ms/german-originality/heritage/german-traditions/german-traditions.html

Poland: http://www.pgsa.org/traditions.php

Australia: http://www.wilsons.id.au/wp-content/uploads/Australian_Christmas.pdf

Greece: http://www.keeptalkinggreece.com/2013/12/01/christmas-season-officially-open/

Arlene Stafford-Wilson, Genealogist, Historian, Author – http://www.staffordwilson.com

I invite you to comment on your family’s Christmas traditions below and share with our readers:

Genealogy Tip: Free Online Searchable Surname Origins & Meanings

Map of the world ancient

Have you ever wondered about the origin and meaning of your surname? Would you like to know the location in the world where your surname was first used?

Today, there are many free online searchable databases where you can find out more about your surname. With these helpful links below, you will find that family names may be derived from: nicknames, physical attributes, counties, trades, heraldic charges and many other sources.

Please note that some individuals and families have changed their names at some time in the past, so the surname that you use today, may be a variation of the original that was possibly written in another language.

 

History of Surnames: http://surnames.behindthename.com/

Meaning and History of your Surname: http://www.ancestry.ca/learn/facts

Surname Database: over 49,500 names: http://www.surnamedb.com/
(While this database offers products for sale, it’s still worth a look, as it provides a good description of the surname origin)

Origin and Meaning thousands of Surnames: http://genealogy.familyeducation.com/family-names-surnames/meaning-origin

For more free Genealogy Tips and Links:

https://arlenestaffordwilson.wordpress.com/category/genealogy-tips-help-links/

Free Online Searchable Land Records 1763-1865

Tobias Stafford petition

Did your ancestors immigrate to North America between 1763-1865? This online database contains more than 82,000 individuals who arrived in present-day Ontario, Canada between 1783 and 1865. Keep in mind that may pioneers from America landed and settled first in this particular area of Canada before moving on to the United States.

To obtain a grant of free land, each pioneer settler was required to submit a written petition. He had to supply the necessary certificates from a local judge confirming his age, that he was of good character, and if available a discharge certificate from the military. Usually, the documents were returned so they are not included with these land petitions.

The process of granting the land followed four essential steps:

• Assigning of specific lots to each settler;
• The land assigned was surveyed to establish exact boundaries
• Settlers were required to clear and cultivate a small section of the land
and build a dwelling house
• Finally, when all of these requirements were satisfied, the deed was issued

Index of Land Petitions of Upper Canada

This link is an index to the petitions, with full details on where the actual petitions can be found for each individual listed. Remember to note the microfilm, volume, and page numbers, so you may easily find your ancestor’s land records using the next link:

To see the actual images of your ancestor’s land petition:

Digitized Image of Land Petition

The digitized images are presented in PDF, but there is also a link on the page to the JPG file if you would like to print the record or save it to your computer’s hard drive.
To borrow these microfilms:

These microfilms may be loaned to other libraries across the country (NAC Series RG 1, L 3) from the Archives: http://www.bac-lac.gc.ca/eng/services/loans-other-institutions/Pages/loans-other-institutions.aspx

Good luck with your search and I invite you to post questions and comments!

http://www.staffordwilson.com

Genealogy Tip: Free Searchable Online Passenger Lists

Dorothea Woolsey passenger list

Have you ever wondered how and when your ancestor crossed the ocean to Canada or the U.S.? For those who arrived in the 1800s and later, it wasn’t until the early 1920s that commercial flights were offered, and even then, only available to the very wealthy. In the 1930s and 1940s, many still travelled by passenger ship.

Anyone travelling by ship was recorded in a ‘passenger manifest’, and depending on the line, the information recorded could be either very basic or extremely detailed. At the very least, a passenger manifest will tell you the date that your ancestor set sail, the name of the city or port where the ship originated, and a list of the names of every passenger.

More detailed ship’s manifests will also list your ancestor’s nationality, age, their occupation, and their final destination. It may even list the name of the person and address where they will be visiting or where they intend to live.

The image above is the passenger manifest which lists my great-grandfather William Woolsey, with two of his daughters – Grace and my grandmother Dorothea Woolsey. The ship’s manifest shows that the year is 1909, they are travelling from England and their final destination is Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada. It lists my g-grandfather’s occupation – a butcher and lists the occupations of my grandmother and her sister – housekeeper and shop girl. This is typical information that may be gathered from a ship’s manifest and adds another element to your genealogical research.

Listed below are three of the top free searchable online databases listing passengers immigrating to both Canada and the U.S. :

Collections Canada – also includes American records in the case where the port of entry was in the U.S. and the passengers either remained in the U.S. or continued on by train to Canada.
The databases include – Passenger Lists, Border Entry and Immigration records
http://www.collectionscanada.gc.ca/022/022-908.002-e.html

The Ships List
Over 3,500 free passenger lists to Canada, U.S, and Australia
http://www.theshipslist.com/

The Immigrant Ships website has over 14,000 records of passenger manifests
http://www.immigrantships.net/

Good Luck with your search! Please leave any questions or comments below.

http://www.staffordwilson.com