Rural Polling Station # 32 DeWitt’s Corners

Rural Polling Station # 32  DeWitt’s Corners,

1963 Voter’s List

DeWitt's Corners Voter's List 1963DeWitt's Corners voter's list 2 of 3DeWitt's Corners voter's list 3 of 4DeWitt's Corners voter's list 4 of 4

Voters Lists, Federal Elections.   R1003-6-3-E (RG113-B).  1963 – Library and Archives Canada, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada

Who were the candidates…….and what were the issues of those times?

(from “The Perth Courier” -listed in the order they appeared in the paper)

George Doucett, PC

Occupation:  Farmer

Doucett owned a farm, one mile from Carleton Place, in Ramsay Township, and also owned an insurance business

What were his issues?

-Every worker should have two weeks paid holiday

-New jobs to reduce unemployment

 

Vince Kelly, Liberal

Occupation: International Business Machines company, also had a law degree

What were his issues:

-Strengthen economics, and boost the undervalued dollar

-Ensure adequate pricing for farm goods

 

Charles Ogilvie, New Democratic

Occupation: not stated

What were his issues:

-Schools with adequate staff, and better curriculum

-Remove the financial barrier for higher education

R.H. James, Social Credit

Occupation: not stated

What were his issues:

-Reduce taxes: All families with an income of less than $5,000 would be Income Tax free

-Prohibit the import of dairy products from other countries into Canada

 

….and so the big night finally arrived, and all of the community around DeWitt’s Corners, headed to Cavanagh’s general store (our polling station) to cast their ballots…

cavanaghs-store-black-and-white

Cavanagh’s store – our local polling station for the DeWitt’s Corners area

 

Our parents always dressed up to vote.  It was very important to them to exercise their democratic rights.  Both veterans of WWII, they were aware of many other countries in the world who did  not have this privilege.

In those days, it was customary for men to wear a hat with their dress clothes, and so, along with his best suit, our Dad wore his hat, and Mother wore her good ‘church’ dress, to Cavanagh’s, on voting night.

Our parents seldom voted for the same party, and lively discussions were commonplace at our house, in the weeks leading up to the election.

Our father, having grown up in Lanark County, and keeping with the tradition of his family, always voted for the Conservatives.  My mother, seeking new ideas, and new ways of doing things, split her vote between the Liberals and the NDP.

As they left the old house, the evening of the election, dressed in their finest, my father would tip his hat to us, with a mischievous smile, as they walked out the door, and he’d say, “I’m going to cancel your mother’s vote now.”

 

http://www.staffordwilson.com

 

…………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………..

And who were the cute little kids running around DeWitt’s Corners in those days?

 

Class of 1958  –    S.S. # 4  Bathurst School – taught by Mary Jordan

DeWitt's School photo

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